10x10x10xTieton Juror Spotlight on Rodolfo and Susanna

One of the best parts of 10x10x10xTieton is its phenomenal roster of jurors. This year is no exception. Our 2016 jurors are:

Rodolfo Salgado, Cofounder/Director, Calliope Arts, Louisville KY
Susanna Crum, Cofounder, Calliope Arts & Assistant Professor, Indiana University
Adam Gildar, Owner/Director, Gildar Gallery & Director, ArtPlant, Denver CO

To help you get to know them better, we asked our jurors a few questions. First up is Rodolfo and Susanna of Calliope Arts.

Don't forget, submissions are due June 13. Submit your work today!

RODOLFO SAGADO

Hi Rodolfo!

Hi Rodolfo!

Rodolfo Salgado currently lives and works in Louisville, KY, where he directs a printmaking studio, Calliope Arts, which provides professional and emerging artists with facilities for relief, woodcut, intaglio, and lithography. In 2012, Rodolfo received an MFA in Printmaking at The University of Iowa, where he was a Iowa Arts Fellow. In 2007, he graduated with a BFA in Printmaking from California State University, Chico. He grew up in San Bernardino, California. Rodolfo has received numerous grants, fellowships, and scholarships including the Iowa Arts Fellowship, the Sarah Hamilton Scholarship, and the Janet Turner Memorial Scholarship. His works are included in the collections of the Kohler Art Library, Southern Graphics Council Archives, Georgetown University Art Collection, and the Janet Turner Print Museum. Rodolfo exhibits nationally and internationally. Recent exhibitions include the Huff Gallery, Louisville, KY (2014); Rock Island Art Gallery, Rock Island, IL (2013); and the Liu Haisu Art Museum, Shanghai (2011). Currently, Rodolfo teaches fine art classes for high schoolers with the Louisville Visual Art Association, and is an adjunct faculty member at the Kentucky College of Art and Design.

Why print? Why Calliope Arts?

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

I like how print processes like lithography, engraving, and etching have an air of authority to them. People see them, and even though they haven't been widespread commercial illustration methods for a century or more, they seem to believe in those images. I like to have my prints borrow this authenticity, even though they're constructed mechanisms from my imagination and crazy collections of artifacts. If you can pull off a four-color print decently, then you can do nearly anything - printmaking teaches you perseverance, how to be prepared, how to troubleshoot, and plus, you can counterfeit money. How can you go wrong? (Joking.) 

For me, Calliope Arts was an opportunity to keep making art outside of academia. I didn't want to move around every year for teaching gigs. Plus, once you get a degree in printmaking, you typically lose access to crucial equipment like printing presses, acid baths - by making my own studio, I'm now able to keep making prints outside of the academic environment (when I find time) and provide a solution to others who are also in need of facilities. 

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

What makes Louisville a creative place?

Louisville is this crazy meeting place of the Midwest and the South, and there's a lot of room for local creative people to grow, and a lot of history. I wanted to move somewhere that I could afford and also help artists make it happen for themselves. I think cost of living has a lot to do with how creative people can be - you can more easily make time to work in the studio when you're not having to work multiple jobs. Which we had to do when we were getting the studio started, but now we're hoping for some kind of stability. We'll see. I think it's always a challenge to keep up a studio practice, but there are enough artists around to put some pressure on each other. 

 

Having been to almost all 50 states, do you think there is an “American art” today?


I think at the heart of it, American art is alive and well. But too often, we have to count on New York or something to justify it - the big gallery scenes, fueled by wealth and corporate power. There are crazy people all over the country doing crazy things, and in some cases these things wouldn't even be called art. I've visited "outsider art" destinations all over the States, ranging from Midwest grottoes to Salvation Mountain in southern California and the Watts Towers outside Los Angeles. I think that the romanticized American ingenuity of the past may be dead - people don't even try to fix a button on their shirts anymore - they just throw them away. But so much of being an artist is being a business person, and you have to figure out how to make that work for yourself. It's an exciting life, and not everyone working a 9-5 is in charge of their lives in that way. 


Susanna Crum

Hi, Susanna!

Hi, Susanna!

Susanna Crum currently lives and works in Louisville, KY, and received an MA and MFA in Printmaking from the University of Iowa, and a BFA in Printmaking from Cornell University. Her work, which often draws from community-based interviews and archival research, has been featured in international and national exhibitions at venues such as the Manifest Creative Research Gallery and Drawing Center, Cincinnati, OH; the Carnegie Center for Art and History, New Albany, IN; the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY; the Kentucky Derby Museum, Louisville, KY; and the Liu Haisu Art Museum, Shanghai, China. Her projects have recently been supported by Indiana University Southeast, the Kentucky Derby Museum, and the Carnegie Center for Art and History. Susanna returned to her hometown of Louisville, Kentucky to start the city’s first fine art print studio, Calliope Arts, with fellow printmaker Rodolfo Salgado. In 2013, she was the recipient of the inaugural M.A. Hadley Prize for Visual Arts, which supported the studio's research and development. Susanna is Assistant Professor of Fine Art - Printmaking at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany, IN.  

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

Calliope Arts in Louisville, KY

Why print? Why Calliope Arts?

I love the social aspect of printmaking - often, artists create prints in a shared studio space, which facilitates collaboration and a lot of discussion. Printmakers aren't locked away in their own studios - instead, they make their work alongside each other. Ever since I worked at Chicago Printmakers Collaborative as a studio member, I wanted to create a community-based printmaking studio and gallery. There was something really special about making artwork alongside emerging and professional artists - seeing how they were making a living, making art. It taught me a lot, and I hope Calliope can provide an environment for others like that, whether they're just out of school or returning to printmaking after a long break. I think that working with other artists can help support and sustain a creative studio practice, and push you further to make work you didn't even know you could make. 

Grand Opening Fun Fest at Calliope Arts

Grand Opening Fun Fest at Calliope Arts

What makes Louisville a creative place?

Louisville is my hometown, so I'm always rooting for its creative opportunities to grow. It's also full of weird, old spaces like warehouses and Victorian-era houses, because it experienced such an economic boom after the Civil War. Because I make work about the lost or forgotten histories of public spaces, it's a rich place for me to make a lot of work - history often has a dark side, and looking further into the past helps us better understand our present. The same goes for many spaces for artists to occupy in the city - it's all complex, and I think cities in general could make it easier for artists to buy and renovate buildings - to cut the red tape and encourage artists with a vision to make spaces to build and support creative communities. Even with economic challenges, there's a sense of excitement here, where artists and art supporters are getting together to make things happen. I see Louisville as increasingly supportive of the artist-entrepreneur, and hope that this gets better - then more native Louisvillians may return to the city after getting their education, making connections nationwide, and bringing their skills back home. 

A group printing project at Calliope Arts

A group printing project at Calliope Arts

Is there a time when an artist needs to go national? 

I head the printmaking program at Indiana University Southeast, and require my advanced and intermediate students to apply to at least one juried exhibition every semester. I've only taught there two semesters so far, but in each semester, a student has gotten into a show across the country. My point is, it's crucial to start a habit of looking at calls for entry, get on email lists to hear about opportunities, and keep an eye out on a national scale as soon as you can. Maybe you don't apply to so many - application fees really add up. Instead, I hope emerging artists and students start reading calls for entry, and applying to the ones where they think their work may be a good fit. Even with a pile of rejection letters by your side, you've started a practice of putting your work out there, documenting it, and writing about it, which will be of invaluable help for any future opportunities. 

Submit to 10x10x10xTieton today!